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Jonah Parzen-Johnson / Joe Westerlund & Nicole Mitchell

Ages 18 and up
Thursday, June 27
Doors: 7:30pm Show: 8pm
$12 to $15
Jonah Parzen-Johnson:
Autechre-esque pings, burbles and boings swirl together in the backs as Parzen-Johnson takes deep, chest rattling sax solos that scale the same ecstatic heights as Mats Gustafson but in a much more disciplined and mantra-like manner. – The Wire Magazine

“Jonah Parzen-Johnson drifts away from his jazz background toward a less defined terrain that suggests Brian Eno, film soundtracks, and the spaces between.” – The New Yorker Magazine

” Parzen-Johnson is more interested in memory, as a wisp and a venue for solidarity with oneself. It works.” – The New York Times

Since 2010, Nicole Mitchell has been named “Top Jazz Flutist” each year by the Jazz Journalists Association and Downbeat Magazine. As a former president of Chicago’s Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, her music celebrates contemporary African American culture as she builds alternative worlds that bridge the familiar with the unknown. Mitchell performs regularly throughout Europe, the U.S. and Canada as a composer, bandleader and improviser. As an artist who embraces the “and” rather than the “or”, her music is imbued with the feeling of jazz, grooves, classical, funk, and experimentalism in ways that holistically touch the heart, mind, body and soul. She has performed with great artists including Ballaké Sissoko, Rufus Reid, Vijay Iyer, Anthony Braxton, Hamid Drake, Terri Lyne Carrington, Brandee Younger, Moor Mother, Tomeka Reid, Myra Melford, Joshua Abrams, Craig Taborn, Jen Shyu and others. Mitchell, a Guggenheim fellow, is a professor of Music where she teaches composition, improvisation and sound studies at the University of Virginia.

“There’s no limit to the imaginative capacity of Nicole Mitchell, a flutist, composer and electronics artist who embodies the best traditions of the AACM.” — Nate Chinen, WRTI Spotlight, Philadelphia
 
“Nicole Mitchell is the preeminent improvising flutist of her generation, adapting and extending the innovations of Eric Dolphy and James Newton.” — Neil Tesser, Jazziz

Westerlund’s Elegies first stemmed from a spell of general, non-specific grief. Early into lockdowns, Carson co-founded a regular online meditation group, the participants finding new ways to share space and time. One regular always played soft music in the background; clipped, bent, and warped by the software, the sounds seemed to shower the group in spectral magic, incidental music that reassured everyone while reminding them of what they had lost. In turn, Westerlund began to process his own drums and metallophones, vocal hums and distended synths, creating a little chamber ensemble for one of once-familiar, now-disembodied sounds. There is a sweet sadness to the resulting “Transference,” the feeling that comes as you watch a frown slowly transform into a smile. – Grayson Haver-Currin

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